Self-regulation theory: Applications to medical education: AMEE Guide No. 58

John Sandars, Timothy J. Cleary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-regulation theory, as applied to medical education, describes the cyclical control of academic and clinical performance through several key processes that include goal-directed behaviour, use of specific strategies to attain goals, and the adaptation and modification to behaviours or strategies to optimise learning and performance. Extensive research across a variety of non-medical disciplines has highlighted differences in key self-regulation processes between high- and low-achieving learners and performers. Structured identification of key self-regulation processes can be used to develop specific remediation approaches that can improve performance in academic and complex psycho-motor skills. General teaching approaches that are guided by a self-regulation perspective can also enhance academic performance. Self-regulation theory offers an exciting potential for improving academic and clinical performance in medical education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)875-886
Number of pages12
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume33
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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regulation theory
self-regulation
performance
education
Teaching
learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Self-regulation theory : Applications to medical education: AMEE Guide No. 58. / Sandars, John; Cleary, Timothy J.

In: Medical Teacher, Vol. 33, No. 11, 01.11.2011, p. 875-886.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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