Self- versus drug-produced relaxation and the effects of instructional set in standardized systematic desensitization

G. Terence Wilson, Mivart G.W. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Snake fearful college students underwent Standardized Systematic Desensitization (SSD) treatment in which they received instructions designed to induce cognitions of either self- or drug-produced relaxation. Half of the subjects in each of these conditions were also given high expectancy therapy instructions and low expectancy therapy instructions respectively. All four SSD groups showed significantly greater improvement than a no-treatment control group on both the behavior avoidance test (BAT) and the self-report measure of fear. No differences between self- and drug-attributions of relaxation were found on any measure. Subjects' high expectancy ratings were significantly correlated with improvement on self-report measures but not related to BAT performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-288
Number of pages10
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1973

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Self- versus drug-produced relaxation and the effects of instructional set in standardized systematic desensitization'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this