Sexually transmitted infections in youth with controlled and uncontrolled human immunodeficiency virus infection

International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials (IMPAACT) P1074 Study Team

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14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), disproportionately affect adolescents and young adults (AYAs) ages 13-24 years. Sexually transmitted infections likewise are a risk factor for HIV acquisition and transmission; however, there is a lack of data on STI acquisition in HIV-infected AYAs. Methods We determined the incidence of STIs in HIV-infected AYAs 12.5 < 25 years of age in the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials (IMPAACT) P1074 observational cohort study. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of HIV control (mean viral load < 500 copies/mL and CD4+ T cells > 500 cells/mm3 in the year preceding STI diagnosis) and other risk factors with STI occurrence. Results. Of 1201 enrolled subjects, 1042 participants met age criteria and were included (49% male, 61% black, 88% perinatally infected; mean age 18.3 years). One hundred twenty participants had at least 1 STI on study, of whom 93 had their first lifetime STI (incidence rate = 2.8/100 person-years). For individual STI categories, 155 incident category-specific events were reported; human papillomavirus (HPV) and chlamydial infections were the most common. In the multivariable model, having an STI was associated with older age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.22), female sex (aOR = 2.65; 95% CI, 1.67-4.21), nonperinatal HIV acquisition (aOR = 2.33; 95% CI, 1.29-4.22), and uncontrolled HIV infection (aOR = 2.05; 95% CI, 1.29-3.25). Conclusions. Sexually transmitted infection acquisition in HIV-infected AYAs is associated with older age, female sex, nonperinatal HIV acquisition, and poorly controlled HIV infection. Substantial rates of STIs among HIV-infected AYAs support enhanced preventive interventions, including safe-sex practices and HPV vaccination, and antiretroviral adherence strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e22-e29
JournalJournal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • HIV
  • Sexually transmitted infections

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