Should physical activity be included in nutrition education? A comparison of nutrition outcomes with and without in-class activities

Debra Keenan, Kirsten Corda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Limited-resource adults' dietary intakes and nutrition behaviors improve as a result of Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) participation; however, physical activity education is needed for improved health. The experimental study reported here assessed if spending time doing physical activity education affected dietary impact results and activity among participants. Standard dietary assessments showed no significant differences between groups, and interviews showed greater physical activity improvements/intentions by the experimental group, which suggests that nutrition education can be shortened 15-20 minutes for physical activity demonstrations to improve activity behaviors without adversely affecting nutrition-related behavioral improvements outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4FEA8
JournalJournal of Extension
Volume52
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

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