Similar mediterranean diet adherence but greater central adiposity is observed among Greek diaspora adolescents living in Istanbul, compared to Athens

Maria G. Grammatikopoulou, Maria I. Maraki, Despoina Giannopoulou, Dimitrios Poulimeneas, Labros S. Sidossis, Maria Tsigga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this case–control study was to compare Mediterranean diet (MD) adherence and anthropometry between Greek diaspora adolescents living in Istanbul and Greek adolescents, inhabitants of Athens. Design: A total of 206 adolescents (103 from each site), aged 10.0– 19.0 years old, all of Greek origin, were recruited from schools in Athens and minority schools in Istanbul, for the present case– control study. Participants at each site were age and sex-matched. Anthropometric measurements were performed, and diet adherence was assessed with the KIDMED score. Results: Breakfast skipping, decreased dairy and increased commercially baked good/pastries consumption for breakfast, fast-food intake and consumption of several sweets each day was more prevalent in Istanbul, but, on the other hand, students from Athens reported eating fewer fruit, vegetables and nuts. The adoption of unhealthy eating habits in each site was counterbalanced by a more ‘healthy’ dietary element, resulting in an overall similar MD adherence between both sites. Additionally, although weight status was indifferent between the two cities, higher rates of abdominal obesity were recorded in Istanbul, when the weight-to-height ratio was used for diagnosis. Conclusions: Differences in several domains of the KIDMED score were recorded among cities, possibly as results of food availability and prices. However, MD adherence and weight status appeared similar, indicating that the dietary transition and acculturation experienced by the remnants is actually very slow and minimal during the 93 years since population exchange.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-232
Number of pages12
JournalEthnicity and Health
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 18 2018
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Central obesity
  • Diaspora
  • Ethnicity
  • Minority
  • Nutrition
  • Nutrition transition
  • Obesity
  • Traditional diet

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