Sisterhood may be powerful for reducing sexual and intimate partner violence: An evaluation of the bringing in the bystander in-person program with sorority members

Mary M. Moynihan, Victoria L. Banyard, Julie S. Arnold, Robert P. Eckstein, Jane G. Stapleton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sorority members may be at greater risk than other college women for sexual violence and intimate partner violence (IPV). We evaluated the Bringing in the Bystander in-person program with sorority members who participated in the program (n = 30) compared with those who did not (n = 18). Results indicate that program participants showed increased bystander efficacy, likelihood to help, and responsibility for ending violence without unintended "backlash" effects. Implications include a call for future programming with more diverse sorority members over longer time. In addition, we discuss what the findings might mean for formal campus policies and practices for preventing sexual violence and IPV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)703-719
Number of pages17
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Keywords

  • bystander intervention
  • intimate partner violence
  • prevention
  • sexual violence
  • sororities

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