Some aspects of chemical ionization mass spectroscopy using ammonia as reagent gas: A valuable technique for biomedical and natural products studies

Ajay K. Bose, Hideji Fujiwara, Birendra N. Pramanik, Eric Lazaro, Charles R. Spillert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of ammonia as reagent gas increases considerably the utility of chemical ionization mass spectroscopic (ci-ms) analysis: compounds of biological interest, such as steroid hormones, bile acids, prostaglandins, phospholipids, alkaloids, antibiotics, etc., display strong pseudomolecular ions (mostly M+ + 18). The need for derivatization and/or chromatographic purification of many types of compounds is sharply reduced. Ammonium carbonate or 15NH4Cl can be introduced into the direct probe for obtaining satisfactory ci-ms(NH3) spectra. Bile salts and some bile acid conjugates can be studied without derivatization. Potassium penicillanate gives a strong peak corresponding to the free acid + NH4+. Deproteinized blood samples provide a detailed picture of individual components, such as triglycerides, lysolecithins, cholesterol esters, etc. Frag-mentation patterns for structural information can be generated by adding argon to ammonia. One shortcoming of the ci-ms(NH3) method is the progressive replacement of halogen with hydrogen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-291
Number of pages8
JournalAnalytical Biochemistry
Volume89
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 1978

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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