Source apportionment of airborne particulate matter using organic compounds as tracers

James J. Schauer, Wolfgang F. Rogge, Lynn M. Hildemann, Monica Mazurek, Glen R. Cass, Bernd R.T. Simoneit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A chemical mass balance receptor model based on organic compounds has been developed that relates source contributions to airborne fine particle mass concentrations. Source contributions to the concentrations of specific organic compounds are revealed as well. The model is applied to four air quality monitoring sites in southern California using atmospheric organic compound concentration data and source test data collected specifically for the purpose of testing this model. The contributions of up to nine primary particle source types can be separately identified in ambient samples based on this method, and approximately 85% of the organic fine aerosol is assigned to primary sources on an annual average basis. The model provides information on source contributions to fine mass concentrations, fine organic aerosol concentrations and individual organic compound concentrations. The largest primary source contributors to fine particle mass concentrations in Los Angeles are found to include diesel engine exhaust, paved road dust, gasoline-powered vehicle exhaust, plus emissions from food cooking and wood smoke, with smaller contribution from tire dust, plant fragments, natural gas combustion aerosol, and cigarette smoke. Once these primary aerosol source contributions are added to the secondary sulfates, nitrates and organics present, virtually all of the annual average fine particle mass at Los Angeles area monitoring sites can be assigned to its source.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-259
Number of pages19
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume41
Issue numberSUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 26 2007

Fingerprint

particulate matter
organic compound
tracer
aerosol
smoke
dust
chemical mass balance
exhaust emission
tire
diesel engine
source apportionment
natural gas
combustion
sulfate
nitrate
road
food
particle
monitoring

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Atmospheric Science

Keywords

  • Emissions
  • Fine particles
  • Organic aerosol
  • Receptor models
  • Source contributions

Cite this

Schauer, J. J., Rogge, W. F., Hildemann, L. M., Mazurek, M., Cass, G. R., & Simoneit, B. R. T. (2007). Source apportionment of airborne particulate matter using organic compounds as tracers. Atmospheric Environment, 41(SUPPL.), 241-259. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.10.069
Schauer, James J. ; Rogge, Wolfgang F. ; Hildemann, Lynn M. ; Mazurek, Monica ; Cass, Glen R. ; Simoneit, Bernd R.T. / Source apportionment of airborne particulate matter using organic compounds as tracers. In: Atmospheric Environment. 2007 ; Vol. 41, No. SUPPL. pp. 241-259.
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Source apportionment of airborne particulate matter using organic compounds as tracers. / Schauer, James J.; Rogge, Wolfgang F.; Hildemann, Lynn M.; Mazurek, Monica; Cass, Glen R.; Simoneit, Bernd R.T.

In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 41, No. SUPPL., 26.11.2007, p. 241-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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