Source reduction behavior as an independent measurement of the impact of a public health education campaign in an integrated vector management program for the Asian tiger mosquito

Kristen Bartlett-Healy, George Hamilton, Sean Healy, Taryn Crepeau, Isik Unlu, Ary Farajollahi, Dina Fonseca, Randy Gaugler, Gary G. Clark, Daniel Strickman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health educational campaign to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats. Three communities each, within two New Jersey counties, were randomly selected to receive: (1) both education and mosquito control, (2) education only, and (3) no education or mosquito control. Four separate educational events included a 5-day elementary school curriculum in the spring, and three door to door distributions of educational brochures. Before and after each educational event, the numbers of mosquito-larval container habitats were counted in 50 randomly selected homes per study area. Container surveys allowed us to measure source reduction behavior. Although we saw reductions in container habitats in sites receiving education, they were not significantly different from the control. Our results suggest that traditional passive means of public education, which were often considered the gold standard for mosquito control programs, are not sufficient to motivate residents to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1358-1367
Number of pages10
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Keywords

  • Aedes albopictus
  • Asian tiger mosquito
  • Public health education
  • Source reduction

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