Stability and carbon isotope changes of soot and char materials during thermal oxidation: Implication for quantification and source appointment

Jianzhong Song, Weilin Huang, Ping'an Peng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The thermal-oxidative resistances of seven soot and char samples from various combustion processes were tested with a chemothermal oxidation (CTO) method. The residues of each soot/char oxidized at different temperature conditions were quantified for the remaining organic carbon contents and their stable carbon isotope compositions. The results showed that the soot/char samples had distinctly different resistance to CTO, with half-temperature values of 380-409°C for diesel- and hexane-derived soots, 276-312°C for biomass- and coal-derived soots, and 257-323°C for the other two chars. The lower thermal resistance of the two biomass soots and coal soot suggested that they likely were formed at lower combustion temperatures and that they cannot be detected or quantified in environmental samples using the standard CTO-375 method. The stable carbon isotope data showed three different modes of δ 13C shifts as the combustion temperature increased. Both diesel and hexane soots had no change of δ 13C values during CTO treatment. The δ 13C values of the coal soot shifted to more negative whereas the δ 13C values of the other four biomass-derived soot/char samples became more positive. The data suggested that interpretation of δ 13C data for residual BC materials after thermal treatment should be cautious.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-164
Number of pages6
JournalChemical Geology
Volume330-331
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 10 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geology
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Keywords

  • BC
  • CTO
  • Char
  • Soot
  • Stable carbon isotope

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