Stake culture reduces foliar disease and postharvest fruit rot in tomatoes grown under weekly or forecaster-generated fungicide schedules

William H. Tietjen, Winfred P. Cowgill, Martha H. Maletta, Peter J. Nitzsche, Stephen A. Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of disease forecasting systems and stake or ground culture on foliar and postharvest disease control for tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) was evaluated during two growing seasons in northern New Jersey. Foliar disease was reduced and marketable yield increased by stake culture. Percent of postharvest losses, including loss due to anthracnose, was significantly reduced by stake culture. Effectiveness of disease control schedules, weekly or forecaster-generated, was not affected by cultural system. Disease forecasting was shown to have potential for optimizing fungicide use in tomato production by controlling foliar disease and fruit anthracnose with fewer applications than a weekly schedule.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)230-233
Number of pages4
JournalHortTechnology
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Horticulture

Keywords

  • Alternaria solani
  • Anthracnose
  • Chlorothalonil
  • Colletotrichum
  • Copper sulfate
  • Disease forecasting
  • Early blight
  • Lycopersicon esculentum

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