State versus trait weight, shape, and eating concerns: Disentangling influence on eating behaviors among sexual minority women

Emily Panza, Kay Loni Olson, Edward A. Selby, Rena R. Wing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the relative influence of trait and state weight, shape, and eating concerns on dysregulated eating in the daily lives of sexual minority women with overweight and obesity. This study is a secondary analysis of data from an Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) study of 55 sexual minority women with overweight/obesity. Trait shape, weight, and eating concerns were assessed at baseline. For the following five days, participants used a smartphone to report state weight/shape concerns, overeating, and binge eating five times daily. Women who endorsed higher levels of trait weight, shape, and eating concerns at baseline reported more frequent state weight/shape concerns in daily life. Trait eating concerns were associated with higher odds of binge eating during EMA, but trait weight/shape concerns were unrelated to future dysregulated eating. In daily life, state weight/shape concerns was associated with greater risk for over/binge eating at the concurrent EMA prompt, the subsequent EMA prompt, and over the course of a full day, independent of trait concerns. State weight and shape concerns may play an important role in predicting dysregulated eating in daily life among sexual minority women of higher body weight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-116
Number of pages10
JournalBody Image
Volume36
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Keywords

  • Body dissatisfaction
  • Ecological momentary assessment
  • Obesity
  • Sexual minority women

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