Strain specificity of soybean mosaic virus seed transmission in soybean

G. R. Bowers, R. M. Goodman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Seed is a major source of primary inoculum for soybean mosaic virus (SMV) in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Although resistance to SMV seed transmission is known, it is not known if resistance is SMV-strain specific. Field studies were conducted near Urbana, IL, to determine (i) if differences exist among SMV strains in their ability to be seed transmitted and (ii) whether resistance to seed transmission of one SMV strain holds for all strains. The first study used the soybean lines ‘Midwest’, PI 86146, and PI 181549 (known seed transmitters of the SMV-G2 strain) and strains SMV G1 to G7 to test whether strains varied in their ability to affect seed transmission, seed coat mottling, seed weight, or seedling emergence. There were no differences among strains for seed weight or seedling emergence. Plants infected with the G5 strain produced seed with a lower incidence of virus transmission than plants infected with the other strains. A soybean line × SMV strain interaction was found for incidence of seed coat mottling. In the second study, ‘Manchu 2204’, ‘Mukden’, and ‘Merit’ (putatively resistant to seed transmission of SMV-G2) were inoculated with seven SMV strains to determine whether resistance to seed transmission is strain specific. Soybean line × SMV strain interactions were found for seed transmission, seed coat mottling, and seedling emergence. Data indicate that resistance to SMV seed transmission is strain specific and must be considered in breeding programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1171-1174
Number of pages4
JournalCrop Science
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

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