Structural and vibrational properties of molybdena catalysts supported on alumina and zirconia studied by in situ Raman and FTIR spectroscopies combined with 18O/16O isotopic substitution

George Tsilomelekis, Soghomon Boghosian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Molybdena/alumina and molybdena/zirconia catalysts with Mo surface densities in the range 1.1-5.2 Mo/nm2 were studied by in situ vibrational (Raman and FTIR) spectroscopies and 18O/16O isotopic exchange experiments combined with in situ Raman spectra at 450 °C. The vibrational isotope effects and the combined interpretation of Raman and IR band wavenumbers and characteristics suggest a mono-oxo configuration for the deposited molybdena phase on both catalytic systems at low (∼1.5 Mo/nm 2) as well as at high (4-5 Mo/nm2) coverage, irrespective of extent of association (polymerisation). Isolated mono-oxo monomolybdates predominate on alumina at low loadings, while increasing relative amounts of mono-oxo polymolybdates are formed at high loadings. Mono-oxo polymolybdates and monomolybdates occur on zirconia, with the polymolybdates predominating already from low coverage (1.7 Mo/nm2). A "next-nearest-neighbor 18O/16O substitution" vibrational effect is observed, resulting in small red shifts (2-5 cm-1) of the Mo16O Raman band wavenumber. The catalysts' behavior for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane is addressed and discussed with relevance to the configuration of deposited molybdena.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-155
Number of pages10
JournalCatalysis Today
Volume158
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 5 2010
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Chemistry(all)

Keywords

  • IR spectra
  • Molybdena catalysts
  • Oxygen-18
  • Raman spectra
  • Vibrational isotope effect

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