Study on strain-rate sensitivity of cementitious composites

Huang Hsing Pan, George J. Weng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we conduct a combined experimental and micromechanical investigation into the strain-rate sensitivity of concretes, with a special reference to the effect of aggregate concentration. We first measured the stress-strain relations of Type I portland cement with 0.45 water-to-cement ratio (w/c), and then those of the mortar containing sand aggregates of up to 50% volume concentration, over six orders of magnitude of strain rate, from 5×10-6/s to 1×10-1/s under compression. It was found that, at a given strain rate, the peak stress increases with the aggregate concentration but the peak strain tends to decrease with it. At a given aggregate concentration, the peak stress also increases with strain rate whereas the peak strain generally decreases with it. We then developed an inclusion-matrix type micromechanical model to simulate the behavior of the concrete. In this process the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of the portland cement was modeled by a modified Burger's model with strain-rate dependent spring and dashpot elements, and the stress-strain relations of the mortar at various aggregate concentrations and strain rates were calculated from a two-phase composite model with a secant-moduli approach. It is shown that the measured data could be sufficiently well predicted by the developed micromechanics composite model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1076-1082
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Engineering Mechanics
Volume136
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 13 2010

Fingerprint

Strain rate
Composite materials
Portland cement
Mortar
Composite micromechanics
Concretes
Cements
Sand
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Keywords

  • Aggregates
  • Cement paste
  • Cementitious composites
  • Micromechanics
  • Peak stress and peak strain
  • Strain-rate sensitivity
  • Stress-strain behavior

Cite this

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Study on strain-rate sensitivity of cementitious composites. / Pan, Huang Hsing; Weng, George J.

In: Journal of Engineering Mechanics, Vol. 136, No. 9, 13.08.2010, p. 1076-1082.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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