Superiority of nonpharmacologic therapy compared to propranolol and placebo in men with mild hypertension: A randomized, prospective trial

John B. Kostis, Raymond C. Rosen, Elizabeth Brondolo, Lynn Taska, Delia E. Smith, Alan C. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

We compared the effects of nonpharmacologic therapy, propranolol monotherapy, and placebo on blood pressure, metabolic, exercise, and quality of life variables in a 12-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 79 male patients with hypertension. A significant reduction in diastolic blood pressure was observed with both nondrug therapy (-8.0 ± 1.08 mm Hg) and propranolol (-9.5 ± 1.46 mm Hg) compared to placebo (-0.1 ± 2.01 mm Hg). However, only patients receiving nonpharmacologic therapy showed a reduced body mass index, lower total and low-density lipoprotein serum cholesterol levels, and increased exercise tolerance compared to both propranolol and placebo. Patients receiving propranolol felt less anxious and unsure but showed a significant decrement in nocturnal penile tumescence compared to both placebo and nondrug therapy. Patients receiving nondrug therapy felt more energetic and reported improved sexual arousal and greater sexual satisfaction after treatment. Reductions in blood pressure in the nondrug treatment group were related to both weight reduction and improved fitness. We conclude that nondrug therapy is effective in controlling blood pressure in men with mild hypertension and is associated with improvements in weight, lipoprotein levels, and exercise tolerance compared to both propranolol and placebo. Quality of life assessments further support the use of nondrug therapy in this context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)466-474
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican heart journal
Volume123
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1992

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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