Supply or demand, make or buy: Two simple frameworks for thinking about a state-level brain drain policy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article lays out two broad criteria for crafting a particular brain drain policy at the state level. The first, which we are calling "supply or demand," asks whether a state experiencing brain drain is below average in high-tech labor demand or above average in high-tech labor supply (the latter concept measured by university enrollments). It is argued that the answer to this question matters a great deal to the policy response. The article then proposes a second, related framework for crafting brain drain policies, which is used widely in the world of business. This is whether a state should "make" or "buy" its own high-tech workers. Benchmarking data and a new review of state policy programs are then used to compare what states are doing with what they ought to be doing in light of their particular situations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-315
Number of pages13
JournalEconomic Development Quarterly
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

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brain drain
supply
demand
university enrollment
labor demand
labor supply
benchmarking
worker
labor
policy
Brain drain
High-tech
Make-or-buy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Development
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Urban Studies

Keywords

  • jobs
  • labor force issues
  • state and local economic development policy
  • university role in economic development

Cite this

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Supply or demand, make or buy : Two simple frameworks for thinking about a state-level brain drain policy. / Gottlieb, Paul.

In: Economic Development Quarterly, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.11.2011, p. 303-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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