Support and influence in the context of diabetes management: Do racial/ethnic differences exist?

Kristin Bauer, Dara H. Sorkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the sources and frequency of, and dietary behavioral responses to, health-related social support and control in a racially/ethnically diverse sample of 1,361 adults with type 2 diabetes. Spouses were the most frequently reported sources of support/control for all racial/ethnic groups examined. Mexican Americans and Vietnamese Americans received more support/control compared to non-Hispanic whites. All types of social involvement were associated with good dietary behavior for Mexican Americans, whereas only support was associated with good dietary behavior for non-Hispanic whites. The findings underscore the importance of considering racial/ethnic differences in examining social network members' involvement in chronic disease management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)711-721
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Social Support
Asian Americans
Disease Management
Spouses
Ethnic Groups
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Chronic Disease
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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Support and influence in the context of diabetes management : Do racial/ethnic differences exist? / Bauer, Kristin; Sorkin, Dara H.

In: Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 16, No. 5, 01.07.2011, p. 711-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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