Survey of nationally certified school psychologists' roles and training in psychopharmacology

Jeffrey D. Shahidullah, John S. Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A randomly selected group of Nationally Certified School Psychologists (NCSPs; n = 817) were mailed the 42-item School Psychopharmacology Roles and Training Evaluation (SPRTE) which inquired about their caseloads, practice roles as proposed by DuPaul and Carlson, and prior training in psychopharmacology. A modified Tailored Design Methodology (TDM; Dillman, Smyth, & Christian,), involving four mail-based contacts, was used to yield a 74% survey return rate (n = 607). Of the returned surveys, a 72% (n = 548) usable response rate was obtained and used in the present study. Consistent with prior literature, nearly all (99.6%) school psychologists reported serving at least one student taking psychotropic medication. Primary direct service roles included monitoring behavioral response to psychotropic treatment (28%), monitoring treatment side-effects (23%), and developing psychotropic treatment goals from direct assessment measures (14%). Primary indirect service roles included providing behavior management consultation to teachers of students taking medication (96%), implementing adjunctive psychosocial supports (87%), and providing assessment data to physicians for diagnostic purposes (84%). Despite differences in established psychopharmacological training standards, actual practice roles and training received did not differ between NCSPs from APA-accredited programs and those from National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)-approved programs. Implications for school psychopharmacology practice, training and research are addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)705-721
Number of pages17
JournalPsychology in the Schools
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Psychopharmacology
school psychologist
Psychology
medication
monitoring
Students
psychosocial care
Postal Service
school
diagnostic
Therapeutics
Referral and Consultation
student
physician
Surveys and Questionnaires
contact
Physicians
methodology
teacher
evaluation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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abstract = "A randomly selected group of Nationally Certified School Psychologists (NCSPs; n = 817) were mailed the 42-item School Psychopharmacology Roles and Training Evaluation (SPRTE) which inquired about their caseloads, practice roles as proposed by DuPaul and Carlson, and prior training in psychopharmacology. A modified Tailored Design Methodology (TDM; Dillman, Smyth, & Christian,), involving four mail-based contacts, was used to yield a 74{\%} survey return rate (n = 607). Of the returned surveys, a 72{\%} (n = 548) usable response rate was obtained and used in the present study. Consistent with prior literature, nearly all (99.6{\%}) school psychologists reported serving at least one student taking psychotropic medication. Primary direct service roles included monitoring behavioral response to psychotropic treatment (28{\%}), monitoring treatment side-effects (23{\%}), and developing psychotropic treatment goals from direct assessment measures (14{\%}). Primary indirect service roles included providing behavior management consultation to teachers of students taking medication (96{\%}), implementing adjunctive psychosocial supports (87{\%}), and providing assessment data to physicians for diagnostic purposes (84{\%}). Despite differences in established psychopharmacological training standards, actual practice roles and training received did not differ between NCSPs from APA-accredited programs and those from National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)-approved programs. Implications for school psychopharmacology practice, training and research are addressed.",
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Survey of nationally certified school psychologists' roles and training in psychopharmacology. / Shahidullah, Jeffrey D.; Carlson, John S.

In: Psychology in the Schools, Vol. 51, No. 7, 08.2014, p. 705-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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