Tactile teaching: Exploring protein structure/function using physical models

Tim Herman, Jennifer Morris, Shannon Colton, Ann Batiza, Michael Patrick, Margaret Franzen, David Goodsell

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The technology now exists to construct physical models of proteins based on atomic coordinates of solved structures. We review here our recent experiences in using physical models to teach concepts of protein structure and function at both the high school and the undergraduate levels. At the high school level, physical models are used in a professional development program targeted to biology and chemistry teachers. This program has recently been expanded to include two student enrichment programs in which high school students participate in physical protein modeling activities. At the undergraduate level, we are currently exploring the usefulness of physical models in communicating concepts of protein structure and function that have been traditionally difficult to teach. We discuss our recent experience with two such examples: the close-packed nature an enzyme active site and the pH-induced conformational change of the influenza hemagglutinin protein during virus infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-254
Number of pages8
JournalBiochemistry and Molecular Biology Education
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006

Fingerprint

Touch
Teaching
Proteins
Students
Hemagglutinins
Virus Diseases
Viruses
Human Influenza
Catalytic Domain
Technology
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Herman, Tim ; Morris, Jennifer ; Colton, Shannon ; Batiza, Ann ; Patrick, Michael ; Franzen, Margaret ; Goodsell, David. / Tactile teaching : Exploring protein structure/function using physical models. In: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education. 2006 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 247-254.
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Tactile teaching : Exploring protein structure/function using physical models. / Herman, Tim; Morris, Jennifer; Colton, Shannon; Batiza, Ann; Patrick, Michael; Franzen, Margaret; Goodsell, David.

In: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.07.2006, p. 247-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Patrick, Michael

AU - Franzen, Margaret

AU - Goodsell, David

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