Teaching philosophies and practices in social work education: do the core competencies influence our consciousness?

Jacquelynn F. Duron, Traber D. Giardina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Assessing the mechanisms by which EPAS core competencies are embodied in classroom teaching is important for comprehensively examining EPAS’ success. This case study of one program presents emergent findings about perceptions of teaching, and the influence of core competencies, derived from interviews conducted with faculty members at a graduate social work program. Participants were asked about their teaching philosophies and practices, and the influence of social work core competencies in framing their philosophies and practices. Four primary themes emerged: (1) engaging students in learning, (2) linking the classroom and field, (3) critical thinking, and (4) core competencies are not evident at a conscious level. Participants described strong ambiguity about how the core competencies consciously influence teaching approaches, while clearly stating goals for interacting with students, integrating field experiences in the classroom, and helping students build critical thinking skills. Implications for social work education are described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)603-616
Number of pages14
JournalSocial Work Education
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 4 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Keywords

  • core competencies
  • qualitative research
  • Social work education
  • teaching philosophy
  • teaching practices

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