Teaching Through Interactions in Secondary School Classrooms: Revisiting the Factor Structure and Practical Application of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System–Secondary

Christopher A. Hafen, Bridget K. Hamre, Joseph P. Allen, Courtney A. Bell, Drew H. Gitomer, Robert C. Pianta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

67 Scopus citations

Abstract

Valid measurement of how students’ experiences in secondary school classrooms lead to gains in learning requires a developmental approach to conceptualizing classroom processes. This article presents a potentially useful theoretical model, the Teaching Through Interactions framework, which posits teacher-student interactions as a central driver for student learning and that teacher-student interactions can be organized into three major domains. Results from 1,482 classrooms provide evidence for distinct emotional, organizational, and instructional domains of teacher-student interaction. It also appears that a three-factor structure is a better fit to observational data than alternative one- and two-domain models of teacher-student classroom interactions, and that the three-domain structure is generalizable from 6th through 12th grade. Implications for practitioners, stakeholders, and researchers are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)651-680
Number of pages30
JournalJournal of Early Adolescence
Volume35
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 21 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Keywords

  • academic achievement
  • learning/mathematics/reading
  • middle school
  • school context
  • teachers/teacher-adolescent relationship

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