The acetylcholinesterase gene Ace: A diagnostic marker for the pipiens and Quinquefasciatus forms of the Culex pipiens complex

Denis Bourguet, Dina Fonseca, Gwenaël Vourch, Marie Pierre Dubois, Fabrice Chandre, Carlo Severini, Michel Raymond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

The taxonomy of the Culex pipiens complex remains a controversial issue in mosquito systematics. Based on morphologic characters, 2 allopatric taxa are recognized, namely Cx. pipiens (including the form "molestus") in temperate areas and Cx. quinquefasciatus in tropical areas. Here we report on variability at the nucleotide level of an acetylcholinesterase gene in several strains and natural populations of this species complex. Few polymorphisms were found in coding regions within a subspecies but many polymorphisms were observed between subspecies in noncoding regions. We describe a method based on a restriction enzyme polymorphism in polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA, in which the presence or absence of one restriction site discriminates Cx. pipiens, Cx. quinquefasciatus, and their hybrids. This technique reliably discriminates mosquitoes from more than 30 worldwide strains or populations. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of specific alleles may also be a useful tool for characterizing specific alleles of each sibling taxon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-396
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Volume14
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1998
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Insect Science

Keywords

  • Acetylcholinesterase gene
  • Culex pipiens "molestus"
  • Culex pipiens complex
  • Culex torrentium
  • Diagnostic marker
  • Sibling species

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