The Application of Antibiotic Bonding to the Treatment of Established Vascular Prosthetic Infection

Ralph S. Greco, Stanley Trooskin, Anthony P. Donetz, Richard A. Harvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• We used surfactant-mediated antibiotic bonding to treat established vascular prosthetic infections in an animal model. The infrarenal aorta of dogs was replaced with a polytef (PTFE) graft locally contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus. Infected grafts were then replaced with control polytef or polytef bonded with benzylkonium chloride and penicillin G tagged with radioactive carbon, or polytef bonded with tridodecylmethylammonium chloride and penicillin G tagged with radioactive carbon. Both types of antibiotic-bonded grafts had significantly fewer infections than control grafts did. The labeled penicillin G remained bound to both groups of antibiotic-bonded grafts for at least three weeks. In a second group of studies, surfactant-treated polytef adsorbed parenterally administered labeled penicillin G in highly significant concentrations compared with control grafts. These studies suggest the possibility that human vascular prosthetic infection may be treated with an antibiotic-bonded graft.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-75
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume120
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

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Polytetrafluoroethylene
Blood Vessels
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Penicillin G
Transplants
Infection
Surface-Active Agents
Carbon
Infection Control
Aorta
Staphylococcus aureus
Chlorides
Animal Models
Dogs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Greco, Ralph S. ; Trooskin, Stanley ; Donetz, Anthony P. ; Harvey, Richard A. / The Application of Antibiotic Bonding to the Treatment of Established Vascular Prosthetic Infection. In: Archives of Surgery. 1985 ; Vol. 120, No. 1. pp. 71-75.
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The Application of Antibiotic Bonding to the Treatment of Established Vascular Prosthetic Infection. / Greco, Ralph S.; Trooskin, Stanley; Donetz, Anthony P.; Harvey, Richard A.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 120, No. 1, 01.01.1985, p. 71-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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