The Combination of Living in High Crime Neighborhoods and High Rumination Predicts Depressive Symptoms among Adolescents

Andrew A. Gepty, Jessica L. Hamilton, Lyn Y. Abramson, Lauren B. Alloy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Living in high crime areas and rumination each have been identified as risk factors for depression among youth, yet it is unclear how crime and rumination may synergistically increase the risk of adolescent depression. Adolescents (N = 309; 51% female, Mage = 12.9, SD = 0.61) completed self-report measures of rumination, depressive symptoms, and provided local addresses, which were used to match police district crime statistics. Approximately one year later, participants again reported depressive symptoms. Moderation analyses indicated that the tendency to ruminate exacerbated the relationship between violent crime rates, but not non-violent crime, and higher prospective levels of depressive symptoms among adolescents. These findings suggest that individual-level interventions that promote more adaptive emotion response styles may lower the risk of depression among adolescents residing in high crime areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2141-2151
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume48
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Crime
  • Depression
  • Rumination
  • Urban

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