The effects of daylight and daylight saving time on US pedestrian fatalities and motor vehicle occupant fatalities

Douglas Coate, Sara Markowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effects of daylight and daylight saving time (DST) on pedestrian and motor vehicle occupant fatalities in the United States. Multivariate analyses of county level data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System for 2-week periods in 1998 and 1999 are used. Results show that full year daylight saving time would reduce pedestrian fatalities by 171 per year, or by 13% of all pedestrian fatalities in the 5:00-10.00 a.m. and in the 4:00-9:00 p.m. time periods. Motor vehicle occupant fatalities would be reduced by 195 per year, or 3%, during the same time periods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-357
Number of pages7
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

  • Daylight saving time
  • Motor vehicle fatalities
  • Pedestrian fatalities

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