The effects of race/ethnicity and income on early childhood asthma prevalence and health care use

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Abstract

Objectives. Asthma is the most common chronic illness among US children and is most prevalent in low-income and minority groups. We used multivariate models to disentangle the effects of race/ethnicity, income, and other individual-level risk factors on asthma in a population-based sample of children aged 3 years. Methods. Data are from the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey and 1991 Longitudinal Follow-Up. Odds ratios of asthma prevalence, hospitalization, and emergency room use were estimated, with control for socioeconomic characteristics, health behaviors, and insurance. Results. Asthma prevalence, hospitalization, and emergency room use declined with increasing income for non-Black but not Black children. Conclusions. Lifetime income and sociodemographic characteristics do not explain the excess risks of asthma and emergency health care use for asthma among young Black children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)428-430
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume90
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2000

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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