The impact of Helicobacter pylori on atopic disorders in childhood

I. Lisanne Holster, Anne Marie J. Vila, Daan Caudri, Caroline M. den Hoed, Guillermo I. Perez-Perez, Martin J. Blaser, Johan C. de Jongste, Ernst J. Kuipers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Western populations has steadily decreased. This has been suggested as one of the factors involved in the recent increase of asthma and allergy. Some studies have reported a negative association between H. pylori and asthma and allergy, but data are inconsistent and there are a few studies in children. Aim: We investigated whether the prevalence of H. pylori was associated with asthma symptoms, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis in childhood. Methods: We determined IgG anti-H. pylori and CagA antibodies in serum of Dutch children, who took part in the PIAMA birth cohort study. Serum was collected from 545 children, aged 7-9years (Dutch ethnicity 91.5%). Symptoms of asthma and atopy were assessed by yearly questionnaires. Chi-square tests and logistic regression were used. Results: We found 9%H. pylori and 0.9% CagA seropositivity. Twelve (5.9%) children with reported wheezing ever were H. pylori positive, compared to 37 (10.9%) of the non-wheezers (p=.05). No significant differences in H. pylori prevalence were found between children with or without allergic rhinitis (8.5% vs 9.5%), atopic dermatitis (8.7% vs 9.2%), and physician-diagnosed asthma (7.1% vs 9.4%). Multivariate analysis showed no significant associations between H. pylori seropositivity and wheezing (OR 0.52; 95% CI 0.25-1.06), allergic rhinitis (OR 0.96; 95% CI 0.51-1.81), atopic dermatitis (OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.56-1.98) or physician-diagnosed asthma (OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.37-2.08). Conclusion: We found a borderline significantly lower H. pylori seropositivity in children with wheezing compared to non-wheezers, but no association between H. pylori serum-antibody status and allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, or asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-237
Number of pages6
JournalHelicobacter
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology
  • Infectious Diseases

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Atopy
  • Children
  • Disappearing microbiota hypothesis
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Wheezing

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