The interaction of affective states and cognitive vulnerabilities in the prediction of non-suicidal self-injury

Jonah N. Cohen, Jonathan P. Stange, Jessica L. Hamilton, Taylor A. Burke, Abigail Jenkins, Mian Li Ong, Richard G. Heimberg, Lyn Y. Abramson, Lauren B. Alloy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a serious public health concern and remains poorly understood. This study sought to identify both cognitive and affective vulnerabilities to NSSI and examine their interaction in the prediction of NSSI. A series of regressions indicated that low levels of positive affect (PA) moderated the relationships between self-criticism and brooding and NSSI. The associations of self-criticism and brooding with greater frequency of NSSI were attenuated by higher levels of PA. The interaction of cognitive and affective vulnerabilities is discussed within the context of current NSSI theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)539-547
Number of pages9
JournalCognition and Emotion
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2015
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Keywords

  • Cognitive style
  • Cognitive vulnerability
  • Negative affect
  • Non-suicidal self-injury
  • Positive affect

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