The interconnectedness of relational and content dimensions of quality instruction: Supportive teacher-student relationships in urban elementary mathematics classrooms

Dan Battey, Rebecca A. Neal, Luis Leyva, Karlyn Adams-Wiggins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Scholars assert that the often-impoverished instructional practices found in urban schools are tied to teachers' negative relationships with African American and Latin@ 1 students (Ferguson, 1998; McKown & Weinstein, 2002; McKown & Weinstein, 2008; Morris, 2005; Stiff & Harvey, 1988). However, measures of mathematics instructional quality rarely measure relational elements of instruction. This study responds to such shortcomings by analyzing relational interactions in urban elementary mathematics classrooms in tandem with content instruction of teachers who engage in supportive relationships with African American and Latin@ students. This study identified teachers with high quality student performance, content instruction, and supportive relationships as defined through relational interactions. After selecting two teachers, the results detail relational interactions that show how these teachers established supportive relationships with students vis-à-vis their mathematics instruction. Therefore, these findings offer insight into the ways in which relational interactions add to our understanding of quality content instruction for African American and Latin@ students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Mathematical Behavior
Volume42
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Applied Mathematics

Keywords

  • Care
  • Instructional quality
  • Race
  • Relational interactions
  • Student performance
  • Urban education

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