The Mos/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway regulates the size and degradation of the first polar body in maturing mouse oocytes

Taesaeng Choi, Kenji Fukasawa, Renping Zhou, Lino Tessarollo, Kristina Borror, James Resau, George F. Vande Woude

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

192 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mos is an upstream activator of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and, in mouse oocytes, is responsible for metaphase II arrest. This activity has been likened to its function in Xenopus oocytes as a component of cytostatic factor. Thus, Mos-deficient female mice (MOS(-/-)) are less fertile and oocytes derived from these animals fail to arrest at metaphase II and undergo parthenogenetic activation [Colledge, W. H., Carlton, M. B. L., Udy, G. B. and Evans, M. J. (1994) Nature (London) 370, 65-68 and Hashimoto, N., Watanabe, N., Furuta, Y., Tamemoto, H., Sagata, N., Yokoyama, M., Okazaki, K., Nagayoshi, M., Takeda, N., Ikawa, Y. and Aizawa, S. (1994) Nature (London) 370, 68-71]. Here we show that maturing MOS(-/-) oocytes fail to activate MAPK throughout meiosis, while p34(cdc2) kinase activity is normal until late in metaphase II when it decreases prematurely. Phenotypically, the first meiotic division of MOS(-/-) oocytes frequently resembles mitotic cleavage or produces an abnormally large polar body. In these oocytes, the spindle shape is altered and the spindle fails to translocate to the cortex, leading to the establishment of an altered cleavage plane. Moreover, the first polar body persists instead of degrading and sometimes undergoes an additional cleavage, thereby providing conditions for parthenogenesis. These studies identify meiotic spindle formation and programmed degradation of the first polar body as new and important roles for the Mos/MAPK pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7032-7035
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume93
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 9 1996
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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