The New Parochialism: The Implications of the Beltway Case for Arguments Concerning Informal Social Control

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article presents a five-year ethnographic study of informal social control in the Chicago neighborhood "Beltway," where controls at the private and what has traditionally been known as the parochial level are weaker and less important than heretofore assumed. In addition, the parochial and the public arenas are inseparable from each other, not independent as others have argued. Instead, informal social control in Beltway is characterized by what the author calls the "new parochialism," where diminished private and traditionally parochial forms of social control are replaced by a combination of parochial and public controls. The new parochialism is occasioned by wider societal and local changes, and the concept is shown to have theoretical and empirical implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1249-1291
Number of pages43
JournalAmerican Journal of Sociology
Volume108
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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social control

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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The New Parochialism : The Implications of the Beltway Case for Arguments Concerning Informal Social Control. / Carr, Patrick J.

In: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 108, No. 6, 01.05.2003, p. 1249-1291.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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