The relationship between preschoolers' selective attention and memory for location strategies

Fran C. Blumberg, Meira Torenberg, John D. Randall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Late and early preschoolers' attention and spatial strategies were examined in response to instructions to recall relevant objects [Blumberg, F. C. & Torenberg, M. (2003). The impact of spatial cues on preschoolers' selective attention. Journal of Genetic Psychology, 164, 42-53] and irrelevant objects [Blumberg, F. C. & Torenberg, M. (in press). The effects of spatial configuration on preschoolers' selective attention and incidental learning. Infant & Child Development], and to spatial placement of objects within a multi-colored box. Sets of toy chairs or animals were designated as relevant or irrelevant and placed in each of the box's corners (corners condition), in the middle of its walls (walls condition), or in two corners and in the middle of two walls (control condition). Selective attention and spatial strategies were assessed via the removal sequence of items. Recall was assessed via correct relocations of relevant items. Older children and corners condition children showed significantly better recall than children in other conditions. Overall, most children used selective strategies, indicating that relevance of items, rather than their spatial categorization as corners or walls influenced strategy choice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-255
Number of pages14
JournalCognitive Development
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Keywords

  • Development
  • Selective attention
  • Spatial
  • Strategies

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