The relative utility of foraminifera and diatoms for reconstructing late Holocene sea-level change in North Carolina, USA

Andrew C. Kemp, Benjamin Horton, D. Reide Corbett, Stephen J. Culver, Robin J. Edwards, Orson van de Plassche

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Foraminifera and diatoms preserved in salt-marsh sediments have been used to produce high-resolution records of Holocene relative sea-level (RSL) change. To determine which of these microfossil groups is most appropriate for this purpose we investigated their relative utility from salt marshes in North Carolina, USA. Regional-scale transfer functions were developed using foraminifera, diatoms and a combination of both (multi-proxy) from three salt marshes (Oregon Inlet, Currituck Barrier Island and Pea Island). We evaluated each approach on the basis of transfer-function performance. Foraminifera, diatoms and multi-proxy-based transfer functions all demonstrated a strong relationship between observed and predicted elevations (r2jack > 0.74 and RMSEP < 0.05 m), suggesting that they have equal utility. Application of the transfer functions to a fossil core from Salvo to reconstruct former sea levels enabled us to consider relative utility in light of 'paleo-performance'. Fossil foraminifera had strong modern analogues, whilst diatoms had poor modern analogues making them unreliable. This result reflects the high diversity and site-specific distribution of modern diatoms. Consequently, we used foraminifera to reconstruct RSL change for the period since ∼ AD 1800 using a 210Pb- and 14C-based chronology, and we were able to reconcile this with tide-gauge records.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-21
Number of pages13
JournalQuaternary Research
Volume71
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

sea level change
foraminifera
transfer function
diatom
Holocene
saltmarsh
fossil
barrier island
tide gauge
microfossil
chronology
Diatoms
North Carolina
Late Holocene
Sea-level Change
sea level
sediment
Salt
Fossil

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Kemp, Andrew C. ; Horton, Benjamin ; Corbett, D. Reide ; Culver, Stephen J. ; Edwards, Robin J. ; van de Plassche, Orson. / The relative utility of foraminifera and diatoms for reconstructing late Holocene sea-level change in North Carolina, USA. In: Quaternary Research. 2009 ; Vol. 71, No. 1. pp. 9-21.
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The relative utility of foraminifera and diatoms for reconstructing late Holocene sea-level change in North Carolina, USA. / Kemp, Andrew C.; Horton, Benjamin; Corbett, D. Reide; Culver, Stephen J.; Edwards, Robin J.; van de Plassche, Orson.

In: Quaternary Research, Vol. 71, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 9-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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