The Role of Fast Imaging Employing Steady-State Acquisition (FIESTA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Assessment of Delayed Enhancement of Fat Graft Packing on Postoperative Imaging After Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery

Naveed Kamal, Renuka K. Reddy, Gurkirat Kohli, Huey Jen Lee, Yu Lan Mary Ying, Robert W. Jyung, James K. Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the role and efficacy of fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) imaging in distinguishing fat graft enhancement from residual or recurrent tumor after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery. Methods: A retrospective study of 33 patients who underwent VS resection via the retrosigmoid or translabyrinthine approach with fat graft reconstruction was performed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was collected at different time points: preoperative, immediate postoperative (24–48 hours), delayed postoperative (3–6 months after surgery), and yearly postoperative. The image sets contained T1, T2, fat-suppressed T1-weighted with gadolinium, and FIESTA. The radiographs were analyzed for tumor recurrence by the primary neurosurgeon and an independent blinded neuroradiologist. If fat-suppressed T1-weighted images demonstrated postoperative enhancement in the resection bed, a comparison was made with FIESTA imaging. Results: At 3–6 months postoperatively and at 1 year and beyond, 28 (84.8%) and 33 (100%) of patients, respectively, displayed delayed enhancement of the fat graft on postgadolinium fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI. The enhancement seen on postgadolinium, fat-suppressed, T1-weighted MRI consistently correlated with the characteristic fat graft signal on FIESTA imaging and not tumor recurrence. FIESTA imaging was able to distinguish residual tumor from enhancing fat graft compared with postgadolinium, fat-suppressed, T1-weighted MRI (P < 0.0001) due to distinctive signaling patterns. Conclusions: FIESTA is an effective tool in discerning fat graft enhancement from residual or recurrent tumor on delayed postoperative imaging after VS resection. Fat graft used in reconstruction consistently enhances on delayed postoperative postgadolinium, fat-suppressed, T1-weighted imaging, which correlates with the fat graft signal seen on FIESTA images.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e1066-e1072
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume114
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Keywords

  • Acoustic neuroma
  • FIESTA
  • Fat graft
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Postoperative imaging
  • Vestibular schwannoma

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