Theodore E. Woodward Award: Global warming and the human stomach: microecology follows macroecology.

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13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Just as there have been 20th century changes in our "macroecology," including global warming, there have been alterations in our "microecology," involving the microbial populations that colonize the human body. Helicobacterpylori, an ancient inhabitant of the human stomach, has been disappearing over the course of the 20th century. As such, by comparing H. pylori+ and H. pylori- persons, the consequences of its colonization can be determined. The presence of H. pylori is associated with increased risk for development of gastric cancer and peptic ulceration, and with decreased risk for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its sequelae, including esophageal adenocarcinoma. The disappearance of H. pylori (especially cag+ strains), possibly contributing to the risk of these esophageal diseases, may be an indicator for changing human microecology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-75; discussion 75-76
JournalTransactions of the American Clinical and Climatological Association
Volume116
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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