Time trends in the occurrence and outcome of acute myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease death between 1986 and 1996 (a New Jersey statewide study)

John Kostis, Alan C. Wilson, Clifton R. Lacy, Nora M. Cosgrove, Rajiv Ranjan, Janet Lawrence-Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most reports of the decrease in age-adjusted coronary heart disease (CHD) are based on databases with upper age cut-offs that exclude approximately half of the events. We report changes in rates of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and of out-of-hospital coronary death between 1986 and 1996 among New Jersey residents ≥15 years old. Data on patients discharged with the diagnosis of AMI from nonfederal acute care hospitals in the state (n = 270,091) and all records in the New Jersey death registration files with CHD (n = 172,175) listed as the cause of death from 1986 to 1996 (total study n = 442,266) were analyzed. The rate of hospitalized AMI cases in the state remained essentially unchanged during these 11 years, whereas in-hospital and 30-day case fatality among all age groups and both sexes declined. Age-adjusted CHD rates showed a decrease in fatal events, a smaller decrease in total events, and a slight increase in nonfatal events. The proportion of fatal CHD events occurring out-of-hospital decreased especially among men. The median age at occurrence of events increased by 1 year. Despite a decrease in CHD mortality, the rate of nonfatal events increased, especially among persons ≥75 years old. Thus, the decrease in age-adjusted CHD mortality is not all due to treatment and true prevention of CHD, but the disease simply occurs at an older age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)837-841
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume88
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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