Topotactic transformations of metal-organic frameworks to highly porous and stable inorganic sorbents for efficient radionuclide sequestration

Carter W. Abney, Kathryn M.L. Taylor-Pashow, Shane R. Russell, Yuan Chen, Raghabendra Samantaray, Jenny V. Lockard, Wenbin Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

Innovative solid-phase sorbent technologies are needed to extract radionuclides from harsh media for environmental remediation and in order to close the nuclear fuel cycle. Highly porous inorganic materials with remarkable sorptive properties have been prepared by topotactic transformations of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) using both basic and acidic solutions. Treatment of Ti and Zr nanoMOFs with NaOH, Na3PO4, and H3PO4 yields Ti and Zr oxides, oxyphosphates, and phosphates via sacrificial removal of the organic ligands. This controlled ligand extraction process results in porous inorganic materials, which preserve the original MOF morphologies and impart useful surface functionalities, but are devoid of organic linkers. Structural investigation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals preservation of the coordination environment of the scattering metal. Changing the MOF template introduces different metal and structural possibilities, while application of different digest solutions allows preparation of metal oxides, metal oxyphosphates, and metal phosphates. The high stability and porosity of these novel materials makes them ideally suited as nanosorbents in severe environments. Their potential for several radionuclide separations is demonstrated, including decontamination of high level nuclear waste, extraction of lanthanides, and remediation of radionuclide-contaminated seawater.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5231-5243
Number of pages13
JournalChemistry of Materials
Volume26
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 23 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Materials Chemistry

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Topotactic transformations of metal-organic frameworks to highly porous and stable inorganic sorbents for efficient radionuclide sequestration'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this