Transfection of wild-type but not mutant p53 induces early monocytic differentiation in HL60 cells and increases their sensitivity to stress

D. Banerjee, H. J. Lenz, B. Schnieders, D. J. Manno, J. F. Ju, C. P. Spears, D. Hochhauser, K. Danenberg, P. Danenberg, J. R. Bertino

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56 Scopus citations

Abstract

HL60 cells, which lack the p53 gene due to a deletion, were used as an in vitro model system to study the effect of wild-type p53 gene expression on hematopoietic differentiation. We transfected HL60 cells with wild-type p53 and two mutant p53 cDNAs encoding the Val to Ala mutation at codon 143 and the Arg to Trp mutation at codon 248. Flow cytometry, growth, and cytochemical analysis for α-napthyl-butyrate esterase activity and nitroblue tetrazolium reduction indicated that wild-type p53 but not mutant p53 induced early monocytic differentiation in the transfected HL60 cells without terminal growth arrest. The wild-type p53 transfectants did not differentiate along the granulocytic pathway, even when induced with 1.25% DMSO for 6 days; rather, these cells resembled monocytic cells, confirming that wild-type p53 transfection caused these cells to become committed to differentiate along the monocytic pathway. HL60 cells transfected with wild-type p53 were more sensitive to stress, such as growth in serum-depleted medium and exposure to a chemotherapeutic agent, etoposide.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1405-1413
Number of pages9
JournalCell Growth and Differentiation
Volume6
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1995

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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