Transformation of the mechanism of triple-helix peptide folding in the absence of a C-terminal nucleation domain and its implications for mutations in collagen disorders

Alexei V. Buevich, Teresita Silva, Barbara Brodsky, Jean Baum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Folding abnormalities of the triple helix have been demonstrated in collagen diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta in which the mutation leads to the substitution of a single Gly in the (Gly-X-Y)n sequence pattern by a larger residue. Model peptides can be used to clarify the details of normal collagen folding and the consequences of the interruption of that folding by a Gly substitution. NMR and CD studies show that placement of a (GPO)4 nucleation domain at the N terminus rather than the C terminus of a native collagen sequence allows the formation of a stable triple helix but alters the folding mechanism. Although C- to N-terminal directional folding occurs when the nucleation domain is at the C terminus, there is no preferential folding direction when the nucleation domain is at the N terminus. The lack of zipper-like directional folding does not interfere with triple-helix formation, and when a Gly residue is replaced by Ser to model an osteogenesis imperfecta mutation, the peptide with the N-terminal (GPO)4 domain can still form a good triple helix N-terminal to the mutation site. These peptide studies raise the possibility that mutant collagen could fold in a C to N direction in a zipper-like manner up to the mutation site and that completion of the triple helix N-terminal to the mutation would involve an alternative mechanism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46890-46895
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume279
Issue number45
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 5 2004

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Nucleation
Collagen
Peptides
Mutation
Fasteners
Osteogenesis Imperfecta
Substitution reactions
Collagen Diseases
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Direction compound

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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title = "Transformation of the mechanism of triple-helix peptide folding in the absence of a C-terminal nucleation domain and its implications for mutations in collagen disorders",
abstract = "Folding abnormalities of the triple helix have been demonstrated in collagen diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta in which the mutation leads to the substitution of a single Gly in the (Gly-X-Y)n sequence pattern by a larger residue. Model peptides can be used to clarify the details of normal collagen folding and the consequences of the interruption of that folding by a Gly substitution. NMR and CD studies show that placement of a (GPO)4 nucleation domain at the N terminus rather than the C terminus of a native collagen sequence allows the formation of a stable triple helix but alters the folding mechanism. Although C- to N-terminal directional folding occurs when the nucleation domain is at the C terminus, there is no preferential folding direction when the nucleation domain is at the N terminus. The lack of zipper-like directional folding does not interfere with triple-helix formation, and when a Gly residue is replaced by Ser to model an osteogenesis imperfecta mutation, the peptide with the N-terminal (GPO)4 domain can still form a good triple helix N-terminal to the mutation site. These peptide studies raise the possibility that mutant collagen could fold in a C to N direction in a zipper-like manner up to the mutation site and that completion of the triple helix N-terminal to the mutation would involve an alternative mechanism.",
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Transformation of the mechanism of triple-helix peptide folding in the absence of a C-terminal nucleation domain and its implications for mutations in collagen disorders. / Buevich, Alexei V.; Silva, Teresita; Brodsky, Barbara; Baum, Jean.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 279, No. 45, 05.11.2004, p. 46890-46895.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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