Treatment of experimental endocarditis caused by multidrug resistant Enterococcus faecium with ramoplanin and penicillin

David Landman, John M. Quale, Sibte Burney, Barry Kreiswirth, Barbara M. Willey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Antibiotic resistant strains of enterococci are being isolated with increasing frequency. Effective treatment of infections caused by Enterococcus faecium resistant to ampicillin, vancomycin and aminoglycosides has not been established. We studied the activity of ramoplanin, a new lipoglycopeptide antibiotic, against two strains of multidrug resistant E. faecium. In time kill studies, ramoplanin was bactericidal against both strains, but not in the presence of 50% serum. The combination of ramoplanin and penicillin was bactericidal even in the presence of serum. In rabbits with experimental endocarditis neither penicillin nor ramoplanin significantly reduced vegetation colony counts when given alone, although ramoplanin significantly reduced spleen and kidney bacterial counts of both strains. The combination of ramoplanin plus penicillin resulted in a significant reduction of vegetation bacterial counts (-3.2 and -3.7 log10 cfu/g for strains VA3 and MMC3, respectively, P < 0.01). All spleen cultures and 9 out of 10 kidney cultures from each strain were sterile following combination therapy. While ramoplanin will not be available for parenteral therapy, further research into the development of other lipoglycopeptide antibiotics is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-329
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 6 1996

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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