Understanding the relationship between suicidality and psychopathy: An examination of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior

Joye C. Anestis, Michael D. Anestis, Katrina A. Rufino, Robert J. Cramer, Holly Miller, Lauren R. Khazem, Thomas E. Joiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

A number of studies have reported a bifurcated relationship between psychopathy and suicidality, such that suicidality is positively related to Factor 2 (impulsive-antisocial lifestyle) of psychopathy but negatively related or unrelated to Factor 1 (affective-interpersonal deficits). The present study aims to expand these findings by investigating this relationship through the lens of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior across both undergraduate and forensic samples. We hypothesized that, although both Factors 1 and 2 would be associated with the acquired capability for suicide, Factor 2 would exhibit a unique relationship with suicidal desire (perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness). Results were largely supportive of these hypotheses, although differences were noted across samples and measures. Findings highlight the importance of precision in the assessment of antisociality and suggest potential differences in the construct of psychopathy between non-criminal and criminal samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-368
Number of pages20
JournalArchives of Suicide Research
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2016
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Keywords

  • Interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide
  • Psychopathy
  • Suicidality

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