Use of bioretention basins to meet new stringent storm water regulations

James F. Cosgrove, Jeremiah Bergstrom

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

New policies and proposed regulations in New Jersey require that no increase in storm water pollutant loads from proposed residential and commercial developments occur. In order to achieve such a requirement, very advanced forms of storm water best management practices (BMPs) must be employed. Rather than using conventional detention basins, engineers must become much more creative with storm water management. A bioretention basin is one advanced BMP that can achieve very high levels of pollutant removal. It is designed to manage and treat storm water runoff using a conditioned planting soil bed and planting materials to filter runoff captured by a collection system and transmitted to the basin. The system combines physical filtering and adsorption with biological processes using a shallow ponding area, a surface organic layer, a planting soil bed, a sand filter, plant material, a gravel underdrain system (if sufficient permeability is not available for complete ground water recharge), and an overflow system. This paper will describe bioretention basin design considerations, expected pollutant removal efficiencies, and maintenance issues. A ten-year monitoring program that will demonstrate the pollutant removal efficiency of a newly installed bioretention basin discharging to a trout production, category one stream will also be discussed. Copyright ASCE 2004.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBridging the Gap
Subtitle of host publicationMeeting the World's Water and Environmental Resources Challenges - Proceedings of the World Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2001
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
EventWorld Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2001 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: May 20 2001May 24 2001

Publication series

NameBridging the Gap: Meeting the World's Water and Environmental Resources Challenges - Proceedings of the World Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2001
Volume111

Other

OtherWorld Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2001
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period5/20/015/24/01

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Water Science and Technology

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  • Cite this

    Cosgrove, J. F., & Bergstrom, J. (2004). Use of bioretention basins to meet new stringent storm water regulations. In Bridging the Gap: Meeting the World's Water and Environmental Resources Challenges - Proceedings of the World Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2001 (Bridging the Gap: Meeting the World's Water and Environmental Resources Challenges - Proceedings of the World Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2001; Vol. 111). https://doi.org/10.1061/40569(2001)211