Use of the optogalvanic effect (OGE) for isotope ratio spectrometry of 13CO2 and 14CO2

Daniel E. Murnick, Joseph O. Okil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of isotopic carbon dioxide lasers for determination of carbon (and oxygen) isotope ratios was first demonstrated in 1994. Since then a commercial device called LARA™, has been manufactured and used for Helicobacter pylori breath tests using 13C-labelled urea. The major advantages of the optogalvanic effect compared with other infrared absorption isotope ratio measurement techniques are its lack of optical background and its high sensitivity resulting from a signal gain proportional to laser power. Continuous normalisation using two cells, a standard and sample, lead to high accuracy as well as precision. Recent advances in continuous flow measurement of 13C/12C ratios of CO2 in air and extensions of the technique to 14C, which can be analysed as a stable isotope, are described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)363-371
Number of pages9
JournalIsotopes in Environmental and Health Studies
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Fingerprint

Isotopes
Spectrometry
spectrometry
Oxygen Isotopes
laser
isotope
Carbon Isotopes
Carbon dioxide lasers
oxygen isotope ratio
flow measurement
Infrared absorption
Flow measurement
urea
Urea
stable isotope
carbon dioxide
Lasers
carbon
air
Air

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Inorganic Chemistry

Keywords

  • Carbon dioxide
  • Carbon-13
  • Carbon-14
  • IR spectrometry
  • Isotope analysis
  • Isotopic carbon dioxide lasers
  • Optogalvanic detection

Cite this

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abstract = "The use of isotopic carbon dioxide lasers for determination of carbon (and oxygen) isotope ratios was first demonstrated in 1994. Since then a commercial device called LARA™, has been manufactured and used for Helicobacter pylori breath tests using 13C-labelled urea. The major advantages of the optogalvanic effect compared with other infrared absorption isotope ratio measurement techniques are its lack of optical background and its high sensitivity resulting from a signal gain proportional to laser power. Continuous normalisation using two cells, a standard and sample, lead to high accuracy as well as precision. Recent advances in continuous flow measurement of 13C/12C ratios of CO2 in air and extensions of the technique to 14C, which can be analysed as a stable isotope, are described.",
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Use of the optogalvanic effect (OGE) for isotope ratio spectrometry of 13CO2 and 14CO2. / Murnick, Daniel E.; Okil, Joseph O.

In: Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies, Vol. 41, No. 4, 01.12.2005, p. 363-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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