Using early standardized language measures to predict later language and early reading outcomes in children at high risk for language-learning impairments

Judy F. Flax, Teresa Realpe-Bonilla, Cynthia Roesler, Naseem Choudhury, April Benasich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of the study was to examine the profiles of children with a family history (FH+) of language-learning impairments (LLI) and a control group of children with no reported family history of LLI (FHĝ€") and identify which language constructs (receptive or expressive) and which ages (2 or 3 years) are related to expressive and receptive language abilities, phonological awareness, and reading abilities at ages 5 and 7 years. Participants included 99 children (40 FH+ and 59 FHĝ€") who received a standardized neuropsychological battery at 2, 3, 5, and 7 years of age. As a group, the FH+ children had significantly lower scores on all language measures at 2 and 3 years, on selected language and phonological awareness measures at 5 years, and on phonological awareness and nonword reading at 7 years. Language comprehension at 3 years was the best predictor of later language and early reading for both groups. These results support past work suggesting that children with a positive family history of LLI are at greater risk for future language and reading problems through their preschool and early school-age years. Furthermore, language comprehension in the early years is a strong predictor of future language-learning status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-75
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of learning disabilities
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

Keywords

  • At risk
  • Early identification
  • Oral and written language

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