Using high resolution cardiac CT data to model and visualize patient-specific interactions between trabeculae and blood flow

Scott Kulp, Mingchen Gao, Shaoting Zhang, Zhen Qian, Szilard Voros, Dimitris Metaxas, Leon Axel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, we present a method to simulate and visualize blood flow through the human heart, using the reconstructed 4D motion of the endocardial surface of the left ventricle as boundary conditions. The reconstruction captures the motion of the full 3D surfaces of the complex features, such as the papillary muscles and the ventricular trabeculae. We use visualizations of the flow field to view the interactions between the blood and the trabeculae in far more detail than has been achieved previously, which promises to give a better understanding of cardiac flow. Finally, we use our simulation results to compare the blood flow within one healthy heart and two diseased hearts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2011 - 14th International Conference, Proceedings
Pages468-475
Number of pages8
EditionPART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event14th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2011 - Toronto, ON, Canada
Duration: Sep 18 2011Sep 22 2011

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
NumberPART 1
Volume6891 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other14th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2011
CountryCanada
CityToronto, ON
Period9/18/119/22/11

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Using high resolution cardiac CT data to model and visualize patient-specific interactions between trabeculae and blood flow'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this