Using practice genograms to understand and describe practice configurations

Helen McIlvain, Benjamin Crabtree, Jim Medder, Kurt C. Stange, William L. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Demands for change in medical practices are coming from multiple sources. Since interventions to change clinical practice continue to have limited success, understanding the functional structure of primary care practices and the dynamics of providing care have become increasingly important. Methods: To portray and understand the primary care office system, we developed 'practice genograms' that describe practice participants and their relationships with each other: Formal organizational structure is evaluated using family systems theory and family of origin genogram techniques. Results: Practice genograms provided a more dynamic, relational model than the organizational chart and promoted identification of relationship strengths and weaknesses within a practice the same way that family genograms identify these characteristics in a family system. Conclusions: Research implications for the use of the practice genogram include enhanced data gathering, increased understanding of the complexity of practices as adaptive systems, and increased understanding of current and potential approaches to changing practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)490-496
Number of pages7
JournalFamily medicine
Volume30
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 1998

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Primary Health Care
Organizational Models
Systems Theory
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Family Practice

Cite this

McIlvain, H., Crabtree, B., Medder, J., Stange, K. C., & Miller, W. L. (1998). Using practice genograms to understand and describe practice configurations. Family medicine, 30(7), 490-496.
McIlvain, Helen ; Crabtree, Benjamin ; Medder, Jim ; Stange, Kurt C. ; Miller, William L. / Using practice genograms to understand and describe practice configurations. In: Family medicine. 1998 ; Vol. 30, No. 7. pp. 490-496.
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McIlvain, H, Crabtree, B, Medder, J, Stange, KC & Miller, WL 1998, 'Using practice genograms to understand and describe practice configurations', Family medicine, vol. 30, no. 7, pp. 490-496.

Using practice genograms to understand and describe practice configurations. / McIlvain, Helen; Crabtree, Benjamin; Medder, Jim; Stange, Kurt C.; Miller, William L.

In: Family medicine, Vol. 30, No. 7, 01.07.1998, p. 490-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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McIlvain H, Crabtree B, Medder J, Stange KC, Miller WL. Using practice genograms to understand and describe practice configurations. Family medicine. 1998 Jul 1;30(7):490-496.