Virtual reality and gaming systems to improve walking and mobility for people with musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Improving walking for individuals with musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions is an important aspect of rehabilitation. The capabilities of clinicians who address these rehabilitation issues could be augmented with innovations such as virtual reality gaming based technologies. The chapter provides an overview of virtual reality gaming based technologies currently being developed and tested to improve motor and cognitive elements required for ambulation and mobility in different patient populations. Included as well is a detailed description of a single VR system, consisting of the rationale for development and iterative refinement of the system based on clinical science. These concepts include: neural plasticity, part-task training, whole task training, task specific training, principles of exercise and motor learning, sensorimotor integration, and visual spatial processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvanced Technologies in Rehabilitation
Subtitle of host publicationEmpowering Cognitive, Physical, Social and Communicative Skills Through Virtual Reality, Robots, Wearable Systems and Brain-Computer Interfaces
PublisherIOS Press
Pages84-93
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781607500186
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Publication series

NameStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Volume145
ISSN (Print)0926-9630
ISSN (Electronic)1879-8365

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Keywords

  • Balance training
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Gait
  • Gaming
  • Motor control
  • Motor learning
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson disease
  • Stroke
  • Virtual reality

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