Voting in the UN: a Second Image of China’s Human Rights

Christopher B. Primiano, Jun Xiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

It is generally agreed that China has a poor domestic human rights practice. In contrast, China has a better-than-average voting record on human rights in the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). Based on a new UNGA human rights dataset that we identified, we found that since joining the United Nations (UN) in 1971, China voted in the affirmative on human rights resolutions 79 % of the time, compared to the world average favoring ratio of 75 %. This positive image of consistently voting in the affirmative on UNGA human rights resolutions suggests a second image of China’s human rights. However, while the Chinese government is willing to accept the international human rights regime, it also strategically alters its endorsement of UNGA human rights resolutions based on changing levels of domestic threats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-319
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Chinese Political Science
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

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voting
UNO
human rights
China
threat

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

Keywords

  • China
  • Domestic Practice
  • Human Rights
  • UNGA Voting
  • Voting Behavior

Cite this

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abstract = "It is generally agreed that China has a poor domestic human rights practice. In contrast, China has a better-than-average voting record on human rights in the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). Based on a new UNGA human rights dataset that we identified, we found that since joining the United Nations (UN) in 1971, China voted in the affirmative on human rights resolutions 79 {\%} of the time, compared to the world average favoring ratio of 75 {\%}. This positive image of consistently voting in the affirmative on UNGA human rights resolutions suggests a second image of China’s human rights. However, while the Chinese government is willing to accept the international human rights regime, it also strategically alters its endorsement of UNGA human rights resolutions based on changing levels of domestic threats.",
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Voting in the UN : a Second Image of China’s Human Rights. / Primiano, Christopher B.; Xiang, Jun.

In: Journal of Chinese Political Science, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.09.2016, p. 301-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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