When trust matters: The moderating effect of outcome favorability

Joel Brockner, Phyllis A. Siegel, Joseph P. Daly, Tom Tyler, Christopher Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

375 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The studies reported here evaluated the conditions under which the relationship between employees' trust in and support for organizational authorities will be more or less pronounced. We hypothesized that employees' trust in organizational authorities would be more strongly related to their support for the authorities when they perceived the outcomes associated with authorities' decisions to be relatively unfavorable. The results of three field studies, in markedly different contexts, supported this prediction. In essence, the establishment of trust seems to be a potent force in overcoming the otherwise adverse reactions that employees may exhibit in reaction to decisions yielding unfavorable outcomes. Theoretical implications for the literatures on organizational trust and organizational justice are discussed, as are some practical implications and limitations of the studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)558-583
Number of pages26
JournalAdministrative Science Quarterly
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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employee
justice
Authority
Employees
literature
Prediction
Justice
Essence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

Cite this

Brockner, Joel ; Siegel, Phyllis A. ; Daly, Joseph P. ; Tyler, Tom ; Martin, Christopher. / When trust matters : The moderating effect of outcome favorability. In: Administrative Science Quarterly. 1997 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 558-583.
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When trust matters : The moderating effect of outcome favorability. / Brockner, Joel; Siegel, Phyllis A.; Daly, Joseph P.; Tyler, Tom; Martin, Christopher.

In: Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.01.1997, p. 558-583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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